Yeah! — First “Like” and first spam(s)

Cristian Mihai

Cristian Mihai

The Internet world sure moves fast.   The blog is up, and, presto, we receive our first “Like” from Cristian Mihai in Constanta in Romania, who seems to be a budding (yet ambitious) author and movie addict and have a blog about writing (and movie writing) (After this shameless and probably unethical plug, here is the link to Cristian’s blog.)

Exciting stuff, but not as exciting as our first spam (or spams, as it happen to be — We got three in a matter of minutes after going live.)

The speed of the spams is as remarkable as is their lack of quality and bumbling attempt at establishing relevance.

First, I got this from Louise: “Hello website admin, your [omitted] website was exactly what I was searching for but you were not on the first page of search results. You could get a lot more traffic if you were on the first page. I found a website which helped me get my websites on the first page and drove a lot of traffic to my site: [omitted]. I now get close to 1,000 visitors per day after subscribing. I hope this helps you.”  — Wow! What a guy!  Out there spreading the good word for the benefit of people like me.

Then I got this from Niles:

Excellent goods from you, man. I’ve take into accout your stuff prior to and you’re just extremely wonderful. I really like what you’ve bought right here, really like what you’re stating and the way through which you assert it. You make it entertaining and you still take care of to keep it sensible. I cant wait to learn much more from you. This is actually a great site.

This is, of course, spam. Besides the horrible language, you will note the lack of a direct pitch.  The identifying information for Niles, the person who made the comment, is actually the pitch – a real-estate/short sale guy from North Carolina.  Yes, Niles, this is exactly the basis on which I want to retain a real estate professional or invest in real estate, so let me get my folks to get with your folks and lets make some money!

Finally, I got this from Jencks:

Woah this weblog is magnificent i love reading your posts. Keep up the great work! You realize, lots of persons are hunting round for this info, you could help them greatly

As was the case with Niles, we have to look at Jencks’ identifying information to understand that he/she/it is pitching blood pressure monitors.

Spam

Image by Arnold Inuyaki via Flickr Creative Commons

Through the wonder of automatic technologies, the spammers reaction time is admirably fast, but their qualification process could need some work and their follow-ups have serious deficiencies.   Moreover, it strains my little head to read run on sentences sprayed with spelling errors and devoid of punctuation.  So no web services, blood pressure monitor, or real estate short-sale in North Carolina for me today.

It is interesting, however, that the business model for spammers focuses solely on the aspect of passive and unqualified prospecting, ignoring the aspects of qualifying, pursuing, negotiating, and closing.   In that sense the sales execution model applied by spammers is, in fact, inferior to the business model applied by scammers, such as individuals perpetuating Nigerian Scams (read more about Nigerian Scams in a blog posting that I wrote after my sister fell victim to a Boyfriend Scam, a variant of the Nigerian scam.)  Moreover, while scammers appear to be constantly improving their pitch (strengthening their collateral, if you will,) spammers seem to focus only on increasing acquisition speed and range, i.e. casting the widest net as quickly as possible.

BTW, the specific form of spam that we see here is referred to as Spam in Blog, a form of spamdexing.  Yes, that is a word! 

As such the target is probably not me – or any reader of this blog, but, rather, the mass of search engines tunneling through the web on a daily basis.  Now, I actually find this interesting, because, of course, it means that the spam business model only involves prospecting in its most tangential form.  I also find it depressing, because it effectively reduces my blog, and, by extension me, to the role of host to a parasite as there is nothing symbiotic about the relationship.

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